How Can We Tell if My Hamster is Dehydrated?

How Can We Tell if My Hamster is Dehydrated?

Searching for the best water container for hamsters? We as a whole expertise significant water is to keeping up a sound body, and the equivalent goes for the strength of your textured companions.

As drying out can have such a serious effect on your hamster – once in a while deadly – it is fundamental to put resources into a jug of water that won’t spill during your nonattendance, which will enable them to have consistent access to the water.

Numerous containers can glitch, leaving water streaming and putting your hamster in danger. That is the reason we strolled the market looking for the best water gadget for hamster. You can go for the best water bottle for hamster there.

Guide and FAQ about the best water allocator for hamsters

Guide and FAQ about the best water allocator for hamsters

Also, presently, the best water dispensers for hamster available at the present time. we trust that with the assortment of sizes and types, you will discover here something that is ideal for your pet.

With such a significant number of decisions, in any case, it tends to be hard to choose precisely which container is directly for you and your hamster. Underneath, we help you pick, by responding to some basic inquiries concerning picking the correct jug, and keeping your hamster hydrated and solid.

Interesting points When Buying the Best Hamster Water Dispenser

When picking the correct water bottle for your hamster, it is imperative to remember the accompanying:

Your hamster cage

The sort of cage your hamster for the most part lives in may direct the kind of container you purchase. A few containers must be fixed utilizing wire bars or plastic cages, for instance, and are thusly not reasonable if your hamster drapes his cap in a glass tank.

The utilization of a tank is at times vital for littler hamsters, which can sneak between the bars of generally cages. Assuming this is the case, picking a self-supporting hamster water bottle holder or a jug holder that sticks to the side of the tank is the best alternative.

The size of your hamster

For littler breeds, for example, Syrian hamsters and smaller person hamsters, the spouts of some standard size containers might be excessively enormous, which keeps them from getting to the water they need.

In the event that your pet is especially little, you ought to consider purchasing a container intended for this reason. For instance, number four on our rundown has a 10mm spout, which is frequently simpler to drink for pets of this size.

Space

In little houses, picking a jug that likewise fills in as a spot to rest to your pet can spare you a great deal of room. The space you have will likewise direct the size of the container you can utilize, so it merits thinking about when you pick one.

Focal points of utilizing the best water container for hamsters

Focal points of utilizing the best water container for hamsters

Hamster proprietors regularly wonder in the event that they should utilize a bowl or jug to hydrate their pet. Both have points of interest and hindrances, yet as long as you pick, spot and clean a jug appropriately, it very well may be vastly improved for your pet than a bowl.

Here are the principle advantages of utilizing a water container to keep your hamster hydrated:

The dishes of water can be thumped over, while the water jugs are held set up on a cage or a strong base.

When you utilize a bowl, there is constantly a hazard that your hamster will pee and never again approach clean water.

Jugs normally contain more water than dishes, enabling your hamster to remain hydrated when you need to go out.

It is a lot simpler for water bowls to be contaminated by rubbish from the cage of your hamster.

If all else fails, it is great to leave a container of water and a bowl of water in the cage of your hamster. It’s likewise an extraordinary method to see whether they have their own inclinations.

Bolstering them will urge them to drink the measure of solid water they need. The dishes enable your hamster to drink in a progressively normal stance , if the jugs are mounted excessively low, your pet should hold his head at a bizarre point.

Best water container for hamsters

Remember this when you put a contain – it must be sufficiently high for your hamster to remain on its rear legs to utilize it.

Tips for cleaning the best hamster water dispensers

Tips for cleaning the best hamster water dispensers

A potential impediment of utilizing a container as opposed to a bowl for your hamster water is that the jugs are more earnestly to clean. On the off chance that they are not appropriately cleaned, microorganisms can develop in the container , which can prompt your hamster’s illness.

  • Luckily, there are numerous things you can do to ensure your jug remains spotless and free of germs:
  • Change the water in your hamster around three times each week.
  • Abstain from utilizing fade, particularly on plastic jugs, as this may harm the plastic and may leave a buildup.
  • Bubbling water can be utilized to clean glass bottles, yet abstain from utilizing it on plastic jugs as they can dissolve.
  • Attempt to utilize vinegar to normally clean infant bottles.
  • The jug sterilizer can likewise be utilized as a more secure choice to dye.
  • Some pet stores likewise sell cleaning items explicitly intended for little containers of creature water, so it’s most likely worth difficult these items.
  • Whatever the root of your jug, utilize a jug brush to clean within and wash altogether.
  • Utilize warm as opposed to cold water to clean the water jug of your hamster.

What’s more, my cost for the best water distributor for hamster ought to go to the models above. They are practical, strong and simple to utilize. What caused me to choose is that the spouts can likewise be utilized with different jugs, which enables you to keep as a lot of water as you need for your hamster.

Walmart Cruelty Tour interviews: Pork is from ‘depressed, stressed, and sick’ pigs, says protester

Ten-foot-tall bloody mock pig stars in the Mercy for Animals’ ‘Walmart Cruelty Tour.’ Photo: Krissy Guzman

It’s hard to keep up with Mercy for Animals (MFA) national campaign coordinator Phil Letten. On his epic “Walmart Cruelty Tour,” he’s been making serious tracks, with a stop in a different U.S. city almost every weekday since July.

Thanks to Animal Issues Reporter’s Krissy Guzman, who we’re proud to have on board at AIR as our very first intern, we managed to catch up with Letten in Texas a few weeks back.

In the towering company of a bloody, wounded, ten-foot-tall mock pig that Letten had parked outside a Houston Walmart store, Krissy spoke with the intrepid MFA campaigner and two of the demonstrators to find out why they were out there in Houston’s blistering summer heat.

Interview by AIReporter Intern Krissy Guzman with MFA’s Phil Letten

Animal Issues Reporter (AIR): Why are you on tour of Walmarts?

Phil Letten: At two different Walmart suppliers we have documented mother pigs confined to these filthy metal gestation crates that are so small they’re not even able to turn around or lie down comfortably for nearly their entire lives; pigs with large open wounds, pressure sores from rubbing up against the sides of their tiny crates or lying on the hard concrete flooring; sick and injured pigs with severe bleeding wounds or infections left to suffer without any veterinary care; and fully conscious piglets being slammed headfirst into the concrete; as well as piglets being castrated and having their tails chopped off without any painkillers.

So we’re focusing on gestation crates.

It’s high time that Walmart follow the lead of Costco, Kroger, Safeway, and its other competitors in committing to phase out these cruel and inhumane crates. Gestation crates are so patently cruel that the practice has been banned in nine U.S. states as well as the entire European Union.

Demonstrators line up outside Houston Walmart next to MFA’s giant mock pig. Photo: Krissy Guzman

AIR: What do you hope to accomplish?

Letten: We hope to accomplish Walmart committing to phase these crates out. Confining mother pigs inside these tiny cells where they can barely move for nearly their entire lives is out of step with American values and it’s high time that Walmart realized that and commit to phasing these out.

AIR: Have you had any feedback from Walmart yet?

Letten: We have spoken with Walmart. They are dragging their feet. Basically every major food provider in the country has committed to phasing these crates out except for Walmart, and it is unacceptable.

AIR:  So no signs any time yet of them phasing out that policy?

Letten: Nothing yet, no.

AIR: And how about the public response to the demonstrations?

Letten: Yeah, the public response has been incredible. Most people are opposed to animal cruelty and when they learn about the egregious abuses, pigs who are raised and killed for pork sold in Walmart are treated, they are horrified and they don’t want to support it any more.

AIR: And with reaching the public, how far has it gone? Have people decided to ban Walmart from their shopping?

Letten: We have spoken with a number of people who have stated that they no longer want to shop at Walmart until they take care of it.

AIR: And how about the response in Texas? How does that compare to the other states you’ve been in?

Letten: Texas has been the same as everywhere else. I mean, to me it’s like, no matter where you go, if you’re in the middle of nowhere or you’re in some big city, you go up to some random person and ask them, “Do you oppose animal cruelty?” nine times out of ten they’re going to say yes. So the same response we’ve been getting elsewhere we’ve been getting in Texas.

Photo: Krissy Guzman

Interview by AIReporter Intern Krissy Guzman with MFA demonstrator Jennifer Gray

AIR:   Jennifer, what are you protesting against today?

Jennifer Gray: Walmart’s abuse of pigs and wrongful treatment of them.

AIR:   And why is it important personally for you to stand up for the rights of pigs and all the animals?

Gray:  Well, because who else is going to do it? They can’t do it.

AIR:   How do your family and friends feel about you and this issue, coming out here today?

Gray:  My mom knows about it. She’s elderly so she couldn’t come out here. Nobody else really knows because I made this decision last night at a HART meeting. It was my first meeting at HART—Houston Animal Rights Team.

AIR:   What did your mom think about it?

Gray:  She’s fine with it. She’s slowly switching over to vegan meals because I cook for her.

AIR:   How long have you been vegan?

Gray:  Geez, not even two weeks, and the health benefits have been incredible. I’m 39 years old, by the way.

AIR:   How hard has that been to switch within two weeks?

Gray:  Not very hard because I was a kind of lazy vegetarian and then I went to vegetarianism and then I realized that you need to remove the eggs and the dairy. I mean, you need to go all the way, because it’s just across the board, the abuse.

Photo: Krissy Guzman

Interview by AIReporter Intern Krissy Guzman with MFA demonstrator Tierra Rodriguez

AIR:   Why are you protesting today?

Tierra Rodriguez: I’m protesting because I stand against cruelty to animals. I’m an animal lover and I support compassion toward humans. And, you know, I stand up for protecting human rights, and I think that my ethical system—and everybody’s ethical system—should be broad enough to encompass animals, too, because animals, they have feelings, they’re sentient, and they deserve to have a voice, a stimulating life. When you hear about the conditions that the pigs in gestation crates go through, like, they’re depressed, they’re bored, they’re extremely stressed, and they’re very sick, and, you know, I think once people find this out, they can’t in good conscience let it continue to happen.

AIR: Why is it important to you personally to stand up for the welfare of pigs and other animals? I know you just probably answered that, but do you want to go into more detail?

Rodriguez:   To me personally, I guess it fits in my value system. I believe that we have the social responsibility to be caretakers of our Earth and of our resources, and so that’s really why I’m standing up for animals, because they are resources and it’s our responsibility to treat them humanely.  It’s just a part of my larger value system, which is compassion, which is respect, responsibility.

AIR: And does your family know that you’re here?

Rodriguez: No, my family doesn’t know that I’m here right now, but a lot of my—I’m kind of like an online activist, so I let everybody in my social network know. I just try to spread the word and educate people. Even before this event I’ve been involved with Mercy for Animals and I support them, I donate, I sign petitions.

AIR:   How would they feel about this issue?

Rodriguez: My family?

AIR: And your friends, too.

Photo: Krissy Guzman

Rodriguez: You know what? I think they would support it. And I think just a lot of people don’t know. You know, they haven’t seen the images, they don’t know the reality that these animals experience. So I think if I were to tell them and let them know that this is a cause that matters to me, I think they would be on board with me.

AIR: OK, and the ones who do know, what was their reaction to you coming out here today?

Rodriguez: Supportive, you know, excited for me.

AIR: And are you vegan?

Rodriguez: No, but I have in my life made attempts to reduce animal products. I’m like more vegetarian, sometimes vegan, but for me I think what matters is really just having the awareness and making the attempt to reduce animal products and that’s where I’m at right now. But I think eventually I aspire to be vegan.

AIR: May I ask your name and your age?

Rodriguez: My name is Tierra Rodriguez and I’m 28 years old. T-i-e-r-r-a—like “Earth.” It’s kind of, what’s in a name? You know, my name, I stand up for the rights of Earth and its inhabitants.

Krissy Guzman’s lifelong interest in journalism led to her first published article—an interview with Houston Rockets player Robert Horry for the Houston Chronicle. Her other passion is for animals, encouraged by her late grandfather, who often picked up ailing strays, nursed them to back to health, and found them new homes.

Currently Krissy works as a kennel tech for a veterinary clinic. In her previous position she helped a pet supply store connect with local rescue groups to set up highly successful adoption events. Following her grandfather’s example, Krissy often does rescue herself. Her own three dogs are former strays.

As AIR’s first intern reporter, Krissy combines her two passions—journalism and animals—to write about animal issues in Texas and around the world.

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‘These guys are good—we don’t like them, but they are good at what they do’: farm bureau about Humane Society

 

Animal welfare groups say Missouri’s large-scale commercial breeders often severely neglect the tens of thousands of dogs used to create about a million puppies per year to be sold in pet stores / Photo: HSUS video (not necessarily in Missouri)

By Katerina Lorenzatos Makris

“The emotion of the puppy, man’s best friend. How do you not want to protect these little innocent puppies?” asked Missouri Farm Bureau’s Kelly Smith in a speech to commercial dog breeders and other farmed animal producers. “That was very hard. And that was something that the rest of animal agriculture had to learn and deal with. It was very, very hard to do.”

The protection to which Smith referred might have been provided by a Missouri law, Prop B, the “Puppy Mill Cruelty Prevention Act,” proposed in 2010 by The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) and other animal welfare groups, who said it would improve the lives of the tens of thousands of dogs—many severely neglected and ill—who are used to create about a million puppies annually in the state’s 1,000-plus commercial breeding establishments.

But the state’s dog breeders and farmers believed it was a law against which they needed to protect themselves, said Smith, the farm bureau’s marketing and commodities director.

Large-scale commercial dog breeding is a $2.4 billion a year industry in Missouri that gives “a lot of jobs and a lot of tax revenue to our state,” he argued.

And because about 30 percent of all puppies sold in U.S. pet stores come from that state, not only produced in inhumane conditions but also adding to the nation’s crushing flood of unwanted pets, according to animal advocates, they condemn Missouri as “the puppy mill capital of America.”

Smith, however, said there is plenty of regulation already, pointing as proof to the fact that in the past few years the Missouri Department of Agriculture has seized 5,500 dogs from neglectful commercial breeders. He added that Prop B would have just set an anti-farming precedent and in some ways would have required that breeders take better care of dogs than of children.

Speaking to attendees at last year’s Animal Agriculture Alliance (AAA) “United We Eat” Summit, Smith explained why breeder and agriculture lobbies in the state fought Prop B, which voters approved in a statewide election but that Gov. Jay Nixon, bowing to its opponents, eventually replaced with a weaker law in 2011.

Animal Issues Reporter’s Katerina Lorenzatos Makris, who covered the AAA Summit, presents Smith’s version of the Prop B tale in her multi-part series:

“Lessons learned in the ‘puppy mill capital of America’: The rise, fall and legacy of Missouri’s Prop B

(Previous articles in this series:

Part 1: Missouri breeds 30% of puppies sold in U.S. pet stores, says farm bureau

Part 2: More than 5,500 dogs raided from Missouri dog breeders since start of ‘Operation Bark Alert’

Part 3: Law would have required better care for dogs than for children, says farm bureau)

Speech by Kelly Smith, Missouri Farm Bureau (Part 4):

So, the campaign. We knew we needed to talk about it, review the issues, why it wasn’t good, and we were ready to go to battle, but we forgot one little thing: how do you fight this? The emotion of the puppy, man’s best friend. How do you not want to protect these little innocent puppies?

That was very hard. And that was something that the rest of animal agriculture had to learn and deal with. It was very, very hard to do.

If you will indulge me, I’m going to kind of fly through the campaign part of this thing, and under a part called “Lessons Learned” at the end, we’ll come back and incorporate several things that happened that I think we need to share with people as far as things that you might want to remember and use in your own states with that.

Vast majority of Missourians signed the Prop B petition

The first thing that we had to deal with in our state is HSUS’s survey that they did said that 89 out of 100 Missourians had signed that initiative petition. That was pretty disheartening. So if we use this as the first basis of a polling on how we move from 89-11 down to about 51-49 in November, we did pretty darn good in our state moving the people.

We just didn’t start quick enough was the big problem in there. In our state, the dog breeders took the lead on this issue which they should have, and most of the other ag organizations basically supported what they were doing.

We have three professional what I would call dog breeder organizations in our state: Missouri Federation of Animal Owners, Missouri Pet Breeders Association, and Professional Pet Association.

Those three groups basically took the lead on this and the ag organizations followed what they did and supported them, because they were a minority in our state. They didn’t have a whole lot of money to work with, period, and so the rest of agriculture finally came along on board with that.

Dog breeders filed lawsuit against animal welfare groups

Our dog breeders filed a lawsuit against HSUS, ASPCA [American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals], the Missouri Humane Society, and the other groups that were bringing the ballot initiative, basically on the basis of the ballot language and the ballot title being biased.

And HSUS did everything they could. This lawsuit was filed in February. It did not get settled until August 9, about four days before the state of Missouri had to print the ballots for a November election.

HSUS did everything they could to drag this out. Every trick in the trade they could do, they did, including going as low as hiring the brother of the judge that was trying the case so that the judge had to recuse himself from the case, which basically took them back to square one. And this was in, probably, July.

So, I mean, every delay tactic that could be thought of. These guys are good—we don’t like them, but they are good at what they do.

Dog breeder couple’s professional ‘politico’ daughter ran an anti-Prop B campaign

Now, as I said, most of the ag organizations supported what they were doing, but there was kind of one little problem that some of them had with that, and that’s the first figure up there. Eighty-nine out of 100 people were going to vote for this thing, or at least had signed that petition. We’re going to get killed. So maybe we should just lay low, not do anything, save all of our time and resources when they come back to Missouri in 2012 with the livestock ballot initiative.

They finally, I mean, the rest of the organizations came to their senses, but the Farm Bureau was out front with this the whole way. We had members that were dog breeders. We had policies that supported what they were doing. We were with them from the very beginning on this.

In the end, two coalitions were basically formed. Missourians for Animal Care was a group that the agriculture and dog breeders put together to fight the ballot initiative. And then the other group that came along that was formed as a result of a meeting in St. Louis that I spoke at, three other people spoke at, in trying to educate the urban people about that, and that was the Alliance for Truth.

The Alliance for Truth was formed by a couple out of Chesterfield, Missouri. They were the instigators of it. They had a daughter that was a politico and she worked on national legislative campaigns, basically. And they just called their daughter and said, “You know, this is not a good deal.” They told her, they said you’re coming home, you’re going to spend the next three or four months in Missouri helping to fight this battle.

So this lady came back to Missouri and stayed in St. Louis, and her basis of influence was in the area of St. Louis and we’re going to talk a little bit more about that later in “Lessons Learned.”

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Coming up soon in this series:

  • ‘Mutts’ comic strip came out against commercial dog breeders, says farm bureau
  • Is Missouri’s Operation Bark Alert really working? 5,500 dogs rescued, but what about the ones who aren’t?

More AIR on this topic:

Missouri breeds 30% of puppies sold in U.S. pet stores, says farm bureau

More than 5,500 dogs raided from Missouri dog breeders since start of ‘Operation Bark Alert’

Law would have required better care for dogs than for children, says farm bureau

Puppy mills make dogs ‘autistic,’ says study

Reporter asks USDA to review study on damaged mental health of puppy mill dogs

Katerina Lorenzatos Makris is a career journalist, author, and editor. Credits include hundreds of articles for regional wire services and for  outlets such as National Geographic TravelerThe San Francisco ChronicleTravelers’ Tales, NBC’s Petside.com, and Examiner.com (Animal Policy Examiner), a teleplay for CBS-TV, a short story for The Bark magazine, and 17 novels for Avon, E.P. Dutton, Simon and Schuster, and other major publishers.

Together with coauthor Shelley Frost, Katerina wrote a step-by-step guide for hands-on, in-the-trenches dog rescue, Your Adopted Dog: Everything You Need to Know About Rescuing and Caring for a Best Friend in Need (The Lyons Press).

Law would have required better care for dogs than for children, says farm bureau

 

Animal protection groups say large-scale commercial breeders neglect and abuse dogs / Photo: The Humane Society of the United States video (photo not necessarily from Missouri)

By Katerina Lorenzatos Makris

While in the past few years the Missouri Department of Agriculture has seized 5,500 dogs from neglectful commercial breeders, a representative of the state’s farm bureau said that not only is more regulation unnecessary, but that a 2010 law proposed to improve conditions for the animals would have set an anti-farming precedent and in some ways would have required that breeders take better care of dogs than of children.

Kelly Smith, Marketing and Commodities Director of the Missouri Farm Bureau, explained to attendees at last year’s Animal Agriculture Alliance (AAA) Summit why breeder and agriculture lobbies in the state fought Proposition B, which voters approved but that Gov. Jay Nixon eventually replaced with a weaker law in 2011.

The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) and other animal protection groups used “smoke and mirrors” to deceive voters into supporting Prop B, or the “Puppy Mill Cruelty Prevention Act,” said Smith.

HSUS however, argued that the measure would have improved the lives of the tens of thousands of dogs—many severely neglected and ill ones among them—who are used to produce about a million puppies annually in the state’s 1,000-plus commercial breeding establishments.

Missouri, which animal welfare groups dub “the puppy mill capital of America,” produces about 30 percent of the puppies sold in the nation’s pet stores, in what Smith described as a “huge” $2.4 billion annual industry that “provides a lot of jobs and a lot of tax revenue to our state.”

Animal Issues Reporter’s Katerina Lorenzatos Makris, who covered the AAA Summit, presents Smith’s version of the Prop B tale in her multi-part series:

“Lessons learned in the ‘puppy mill capital of America’: The rise, fall and legacy of Missouri’s Prop B

Previous articles in this series:

Part 1: Missouri breeds 30% of puppies sold in U.S. pet stores, says farm bureau

Part 2: More than 5,500 dogs raided from Missouri dog breeders since start of ‘Operation Bark Alert’

Speech by Kelly Smith, Missouri Farm Bureau (Part 3):

So what were some of the concerns with Proposition B? The animal activists like to say, “Well, this a dog issue. Why is agriculture concerned about this? Why is livestock production agriculture concerned about this?”

Prop B would have limited each breeder to 50 adult animals

I think the first two things up there, maybe the first three things through there, were why the rest of agriculture was concerned. This [Prop B] set a limit on the number of animals that a person could own of 50 animals [sexually intact dogs over six months of age].

It would only take about a two-word change in the ballot initiative if it ever got on our statutes where it could affect the rest of livestock production. I don’t know about you all, but I think 50 chickens in one of those 300-, 500-foot long [barns] would look pretty silly. The same way if you are a cow/calf operation. So that was a concern right there was the number of animals. It was setting a precedent, basically, that was not good.

Would chickens have qualified as ‘pets’?

The other point that was a big one was the definition of a “pet.” If this issue was about dogs, then why was the definition of a pet in there, “any domesticated animal found near a home or [dwelling?]”?

Well, when you stop and think about this, what other types of animals are found near a home or dwelling anywhere in the rural United States? It could be chickens, it could be cattle, pigs, horses, all could be classified as a pet. That would have had to have been decided in our court system.

Farmers prefer to do their own veterinary care on animals

Veterinary care guidelines were a concern there too. As farmers, we all like to do as much of the work as we can.We do have veterinarians out, and we use medicines that are subscribed [sic] by our veterinarians, but we like to do as much of the work as we can, and in the same way with a dog breeder with that.

Proposition B put in veterinary care guidelines that were probably better for the dogs than we take care of our children with that. So that was a big concern.

Providing access to the outdoors would have made it hard to control temperatures

And then housing requirements. Basically, the housing requirements, like I say, no kennel could at that time or still can today could comply with that. Unfettered access to the outside. So that means they would have to be able to get outside any time they wanted to any hour of the day.

At the same time, you had to have unfettered access to the outside, you had to keep temperatures between 40 degrees and 85 degrees. That’s pretty hard to do when there’s unfettered access to the outside.

The other thing here  as far as an animal-care issue and what they should have been concerned about, when puppies are born, they require 90 degrees temperature to basically survive the first two or three days, to have the best optimum care.

Don’t you think that HSUS and other animal activists put 85 degrees in there knowing that the public really doesn’t know this, so we’re going to stick this in there. It’s going to sound great, but it’s not going to be the optimum temperature there.

Again, what I like to call “smoke, mirrors, and deception,” the things that they use out there. They tell you one story but they deliver completely something different, and the unknowing, unsuspecting public does not have a clue to these types of things.

Stacked cages would have been prohibited

No stacked cages. The animal activists led Missourians to believe that dogs were being raised in stacked cages, letting the filth from the top fall down on top to the ones below when we all know that stacked cages, there is a tray there that catches that and those are cleaned daily with that, but yet the public thought that the filth was falling down on these animals.

And the other thing they do, they slice and dice here, too. They went after dog breeders. They did not go after veterinarians, research facilities, and other folks, local shelters that do stack cages—it’s OK for them to use but not for a dog breeder. So again, smoke, mirrors, and deception; basically a two-tiered action through there.

Prop B would have made animal welfare violations criminal

The other thing that was a big concern, too, was the Missouri laws. Basically if you were not in compliance, it was a civil penalty and a fine, and Proposition B would change that whole ballgame. It took it from a civil penalty over to a crime and put it in our criminal code and was a misdemeanor.

So that’s just exactly what they wanted. They wanted to take something, the current way that we had been regulated, turn people that we trusted and basically change all of that, and we’ll talk about this here in a bit. The county sheriff would be the one that would administer the enforcement of some of these things.

Get fresh AIR! Hit the ‘Follow’ button above to be notified via email of new articles.

More AIR on this topic:

Missouri breeds 30% of puppies sold in U.S. pet stores, says farm bureau

More than 5,500 dogs raided from Missouri dog breeders since start of ‘Operation Bark Alert’

‘These guys are good—we don’t like them, but they are good at what they do’: farm bureau about Humane Society

Puppy mills make dogs ‘autistic,’ says study

Reporter asks USDA to review study on damaged mental health of puppy mill dogs

Katerina Lorenzatos Makris is a career journalist, author, and editor. Credits include hundreds of articles for regional wire services and for  outlets such as National Geographic TravelerThe San Francisco ChronicleTravelers’ Tales, NBC’s Petside.com, and Examiner.com (Animal Policy Examiner), a teleplay for CBS-TV, a short story for The Bark magazine, and 17 novels for Avon, E.P. Dutton, Simon and Schuster, and other major publishers.

Together with coauthor Shelley Frost, Katerina wrote a step-by-step guide for hands-on, in-the-trenches dog rescue, Your Adopted Dog: Everything You Need to Know About Rescuing and Caring for a Best Friend in Need (The Lyons Press).